iKristy Morley
Explore the Watershed

Briar Hill Preserve

    Trail Head

    Prophecy Creek Park, 205 W Skippack Pike, Ambler, PA 19002

    Length

    0.75 Miles

    Difficulty

    Moderate

    Amenities

    Leashed dogs, Parking, Along Water, Equestrian Trail

Trail Overview

Visit Briar Hill Preserve and experience an incredible piece of preserved land in the Wissahickon watershed. Briar Hill Preserve--and the adjacent Cheston Family Preserve at Briar Hill--is located next to Whitpain Township's Prophecy Creek Park. 

 

Since 1981, Wissahickon Trails has been working with individuals and community partners to protect the area along Prophecy Creek. Thanks to these collective efforts, Prophecy Creek is the healthiest creek in the watershed. 

 

Before stepping onto the trail, visit the small, spring-fed ponds located where the Township’s park meets the preserve. These ponds are behind the Manor House at Prophecy Creek. The ponds are an important habitat for eastern painted turtles and common snapping turtles. Northern water snakes, muskrats, and green and blue herons have also been seen here. You may also see the northern red-bellied cooter, a threatened turtle species.

 

Continue your journey by walking northeast toward the green bridge. Cross the bridge and follow the signs. From there, choose between a half-mile, out-and-back rustic path that runs along Prophecy Creek, or a half-mile loop path. 

 

As you explore the preserve, you’ll find an environment that is filled with early and late forest. Along the bank of the creek you will see red maple, sycamore and beech trees. Farther from the creek shore you will find tulip trees. Beneath the forest canopy, look for skunk-cabbage, mayapple, Virginia waterleaf, and sensitive fern. 

Download Trail Map
Trail Details

Trail History

Prophecy Creek

City and county governments, local residents and landowners have worked together to preserve Prophecy Creek. Over the decades, the Haas family has donated many acres of land and conservation easements near Prophecy Creek to preserve its natural areas. In 2018, the family of James Cheston IV and several conservation-minded community members worked with Wissahickon Trails to protect additional land. This brought the total amount of protected open space along the creek to over 200 acres.

Margaret Rohdei